Research and development

At Wolfram Chemie, our Research and Development service serves as the catalyst for your sustainability journey, assisting companies in crafting sustainable and streamlined products and processes. Grounded in a dedication to innovation and environmental stewardship, our R&D services empower clients to realize their scientific and business goals. 


We help companies, focusing on SMEs and start-ups in their journey towards sustainability.  With an unwavering commitment to innovation and excellence, we spearhead pioneering solutions that confront environmental challenges head-on, propelling the adoption of sustainable practices across industries.

Our Services

Wolfram Chemie is dedicated to helping businesses achieve their sustainability goals through our range of sustainability services. Our team specializes in sustainability and takes a customized approach to help clients reduce their environmental impact, lower operating costs, and enhance their brand's sustainability credentials.

Whether serving private entities or collaborating on publicly funded initiatives, Wolfram Chemie brings a wealth of experience to the table, powered by the analytical services performed in-house, to help companies achieve more sustainable and efficient products and processes With a proven track record in the application, execution, and reporting of public projects, our team navigates the complexities of research endeavors with precision and expertise, ensuring that every venture achieves its full potential.

Public R&D projects

Vast experience in the application, execution, and reporting of publicly funded projects, driving innovation and long-term value creation. We can be your next project partner or can support you in the application process (fully or partially).

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Private R&D Projects

We help private entities include technology-based and sustainability-oriented solutions in the chemical, mining, and renewable energy sectors. Empower your organization's growth and innovation through our R&D services, designed to unlock new possibilities and drive competitive advantage.

Why Choose Us

Customized solutions

We understand that each business has unique sustainability challenges, which is why we offer customized solutions tailored to your specific needs and goals.

Convenience & efficiency

With our in-house sustainability consulting team and labs, our services are designed to be efficient and convenient, allowing you to focus on running your business.

Proven track record

Our R&D services are backed by a proven track record in the application, execution, and reporting of projects, ensuring reliable and impactful results.

knowledge & expertise

Our team at Wolfram Chemie has years of experience in providing sustainability services, giving you the peace of mind that comes from working with seasoned professionals.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the key focus areas of Wolfram Chemie's R&D services?

Our R&D services are primarily focused on technology-based and sustainability-oriented solutions in the chemical, mining, and renewable energy sectors, aimed at driving innovation and long-term value creation.

Does Wolfram Chemie collaborate with other organizations on public-funded projects?

Yes, Wolfram Chemie has experience collaborating with third-party organizations on public-funded projects, both as project partners and in supporting roles, such as providing evidence-based research and expertise.

How does Wolfram Chemie ensure the successful application, execution, and reporting of publicly funded projects?

We have extensive experience in the application, execution, and reporting of publicly funded projects, both as a project partner and in a supporting capacity, ensuring compliance with relevant standards and guidelines.

How can Wolfram Chemie assist in public funding applications, even if not directly involved in the project?

Wolfram Chemie can provide support in performing LCAs and other relevant studies to bolster sustainability claims for third-party public funding applications, in line with our commitment to advancing sustainable development

 

Can Wolfram Chemie support SMEs in their research and development efforts through strategic partnerships?

Absolutely, we offer SMEs a strategic partnership (or help them find the best partner) with tangible benefits to enhance their research and development endeavors, reflecting our commitment to fostering innovation and collaboration.

How can I get started?

Use the contact form below or give us a call to see how we can help catalyze your sustainability journey.

Contact

Adriana Bernal Osorio, M.Sc.

Research & Development

+49 30 99 21 18 210

Feel free to use the contact form or write us at contact@wolfram-chemie.com and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

Physical Analysis

We offer a range of powder testing methods such as particle size distribution analysis and tap density:

Particle size distribution analysis

By this method static light scattering is used to analyze the size distribution of particles in the range from 50 nm to several 100 µm. In chemical manufacturing the method is employed to analyse particle sizes in catalysts, pigments, polymers, and other materials, optimizing processes and enhancing product quality. It plays a crucial role in characterizing nanoparticles and nanomaterials, aiding in the development of advanced materials with tailored properties for various applications.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with Malvern Mastersizer S

Density analysis

A method used to determine the maximum packing density of a powdered or granular material under standardized conditions. Tapped density provides information about the packing arrangement and compressibility of the powder particles. It is commonly used in industries such as pharmaceuticals, food, and powder metallurgy to assess powder flowability, compaction properties, and bulk density, aiding in the formulation and optimization of products such as tablets, granules, and powders.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with a compact tapped density tester STAV 2003.

Light microscopy with digital image analysis

For studying grain boundaries, defects, phase transitions, and other characteristics essential for material characterization and development.

High-temperature microscope with automatic image analysis (HTM)

Equipped with specialized components to withstand extreme temperatures, this microscope is used to study materials‘ behaviour under heat and stress. It investigates phase transformations, grain growth, and other thermal phenomena, offering valuable insights for optimizing manufacturing processes and developing high-temperature-resistant materials for diverse industrial applications.

Our laboratories are equipped with drying cabinets covering the temperature range from ambient to 300°C.

Sieving analysis

The laboratory test sieves can quickly and effectively measure the size of solid particles from 125 mm to 20 μm.

Fuel Analysis

Ash analysis

A method used to determine the inorganic residue left behind after combustion of organic materials. This process is typically conducted by heating a sample to complete combustion, followed by quantifying the remaining ash content through gravimetric method. Ash analysis is used to assess the mineral composition, purity, and quality of materials. It provides valuable information about the mineral content, presence of impurities, and overall stability of substances for quality control, product certification, and regulatory compliance, aiding in quality control, regulatory compliance, and product optimization processes.

Calorific value measurement

A method used to quantify the amount of energy released during the combustion of a substance. This is typically achieved by burning a known quantity of the material in a controlled environment and measuring the heat produced. It is widely utilized in industries such as energy production, fuel testing, and material analysis to assess the efficiency and suitability of fuels, determine their heating capabilities, and optimize processes for maximum energy output.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with:

  • Combustion calorimeter (C200, IKA)

Processing Technology and Sample preparation

We prepare the raw materials in the appropriate manner for the process to be tested. Our preparation methods include:

Milling

Milling is a mechanical process used to reduce the size of solid materials into finer particles through the application of mechanical force. Typically, it involves the use of specialized equipment such as ball mills or hammer mills to crush, grind, or pulverize materials into smaller sizes. In chemical and physical analytical methods, milling plays a crucial role in sample preparation by homogenizing materials, facilitating uniformity in composition and particle size distribution, which is essential for accurate analysis of properties like chemical composition, surface area, and reactivity.

Sieving

Sieving is a mechanical process employed to separate particles based on their size. It involves passing a mixture of particles through a sieve, a mesh-like device with uniform openings, where smaller particles pass through while larger particles are retained. In chemical and physical analytical methods, sieving is utilized to achieve particle size fractionation, enabling the isolation of specific size ranges for analysis. This technique is crucial for characterizing particle size distribution, assessing sample purity, and ensuring uniformity in materials, facilitating accurate analysis of properties such as particle size distribution, surface area, and porosity, which are vital for optimizing processes and product performance in various industries.

Stirring

Stirring is a mechanical process used to mix substances uniformly by agitating them with a stirring device. Typically achieved using magnetic stirrers, overhead stirrers, or manual stirring rods, stirring ensures thorough blending of components in liquids or powders. In chemical analysis, stirring is crucial for homogenizing samples, facilitating even distribution of solutes, catalysts, or reagents, thereby promoting consistent reactions and enabling accurate analysis of properties such as concentration, viscosity, and reaction kinetics.

Drying

Drying is the process of removing moisture or other volatile substances from a material to achieve a specified level of dryness. It is commonly accomplished through methods such as air drying, oven drying, or freeze drying, depending on the nature of the material and desired results. Drying is an important step in the sample preparation – by eliminating moisture, solvents, or other interfering substances, it ensures the accuracy and reliability of subsequent analyses. Drying is utilized to determine the moisture content, assess the stability of materials, and facilitate precise measurements of mass and composition, thereby facilitating accurate characterization and analysis of different materials.

Our laboratories are equipped with drying cabinets covering the temperature range from ambient to 300°C.

Centrifugation

Centrifugation is a technique used to separate components of a mixture based on their density differences by subjecting the mixture to centrifugal force. It involves spinning a mixture at high speeds in a centrifuge, causing heavier particles to settle at the bottom of the centrifuge tube while lighter particles remain suspended or rise to the top. Centrifugation is employed for various purposes such as separating solids from liquids, isolating specific components of a sample, and purifying substances from impurities.

Our laboratories are equipped with centrifuge ROTINA 420 R (Hettich)

Thermal treatment

Thermal treatment involves subjecting materials to controlled heating or cooling processes to induce desired physical or chemical changes. This can include annealing, calcination, sintering, or quenching, depending on the intended outcome. In chemical and physical analytical methods, thermal treatment is utilized to modify material properties, such as crystallinity, phase composition, microstructure, and mechanical properties, for enhanced characterization and optimization. It enables the investigation of thermal stability, reaction kinetics, and phase transitions, providing valuable insights into the behaviour and performance of materials across a wide range of applications in research, development, and manufacturing processes.

To create optimal process conditions in the range 100 – 1150 °C we use different size and types of muffle and tube furnaces.

Chemical Treatment and Analysis

Digestion

Digestion in analytical chemistry refers to the process through which a sample is converted from a solid to a liquid. This is done by applying reagents, which may include strong acids and bases. Heat is often used to speed up the digestion process, where both the sample and the agent are heated.

Spectrophotometry

Measures the amount of light, primarily focusing on visible light, absorbed by a substance at specific wavelengths. This information is then used to quantify the concentration of the analyte in a solution or liquid – the colour intensity is proportional to the concentration of the compound of interest.

Proper colorimetric/photometric analysis involves three elements: sample preparation and delivery; colorimetry (combining the sample and reagent to produce colour); and photometry (measurement of the resulting colour intensity).

For the photometric analysis, our laboratory is equipped with a spectrophotometer “Nanocolor 500D”(Macherey-Nagel).

Molecular spectroscopy

Molecular characterisation of solids, liquids and powders by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy provides information on the structure and composition of the material. Both methods provide a spectrum that characterises the specific vibration of a molecule – a „molecular fingerprint“.

  • FTIR-spectroscopy using attenuated total reflection technique (ATR-IR):

By measuring the attenuation of infrared light that penetrates into the sample through the internal reflection element, ATR-IR spectroscopy provides valuable information about the molecular structure and composition of thin films, liquids, and solids. It is a rapid, non-destructive technique. This makes it a powerful analytical tool in various scientific and industrial applications.
Our laboratory is equipped with an ATR- FTIR spectrometer “HazMatID Chemical identifier”.

  • Raman spectroscopy:

The inelastic scattering of monochromatic light by interaction with a sample is the basis of Raman spectroscopy. The scattered light undergoes energy shifts corresponding to vibrational modes, which provide detailed information about molecular structure and composition in the form of a Raman spectrum. The method is used to identify inorganic and organic substances, contaminants, and impurities, and to analyse liquids, fibres and very small particles.

 Bruker SENTERRA Raman spectrometer with integrated optical (confocal) microscope is used for Raman spectroscopy analysis in our laboratory.

 

Potentiometry

A technique to measures the voltage of a solution to determine its concentration or activity. It typically involves the use of a potentiometric sensor, such as a pH electrode or ion-selective electrode.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with:

  • pH Meter (Five Easy FE20 (Mettler Toledo) and IS 2100 L (VWR))
  • Titrator DL77 (Mettler Toledo)

 

Our laboratories are equipped with drying cabinets covering the temperature range from ambient to 300°C.

Physical Analysis

We offer a range of powder testing methods such as particle size distribution analysis and tap density:

Particle size distribution analysis

By this method static light scattering is used to analyze the size distribution of particles in the range from 50 nm to several 100 µm. In chemical manufacturing the method is employed to analyse particle sizes in catalysts, pigments, polymers, and other materials, optimizing processes and enhancing product quality. It plays a crucial role in characterizing nanoparticles and nanomaterials, aiding in the development of advanced materials with tailored properties for various applications.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with Malvern Mastersizer S

Density analysis

A method used to determine the maximum packing density of a powdered or granular material under standardized conditions. Tapped density provides information about the packing arrangement and compressibility of the powder particles. It is commonly used in industries such as pharmaceuticals, food, and powder metallurgy to assess powder flowability, compaction properties, and bulk density, aiding in the formulation and optimization of products such as tablets, granules, and powders.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with a compact tapped density tester STAV 2003.

Light microscopy with digital image analysis

For studying grain boundaries, defects, phase transitions, and other characteristics essential for material characterization and development.

High-temperature microscope with automatic image analysis (HTM)

Equipped with specialized components to withstand extreme temperatures, this microscope is used to study materials‘ behaviour under heat and stress. It investigates phase transformations, grain growth, and other thermal phenomena, offering valuable insights for optimizing manufacturing processes and developing high-temperature-resistant materials for diverse industrial applications.

Our laboratories are equipped with drying cabinets covering the temperature range from ambient to 300°C.

Sieving analysis

The laboratory test sieves can quickly and effectively measure the size of solid particles from 125 mm to 20 μm.

Processing Technology and Sample preparation

We prepare the raw materials in the appropriate manner for the process to be tested. Our preparation methods include:

Milling

Milling is a mechanical process used to reduce the size of solid materials into finer particles through the application of mechanical force. Typically, it involves the use of specialized equipment such as ball mills or hammer mills to crush, grind, or pulverize materials into smaller sizes. In chemical and physical analytical methods, milling plays a crucial role in sample preparation by homogenizing materials, facilitating uniformity in composition and particle size distribution, which is essential for accurate analysis of properties like chemical composition, surface area, and reactivity.

Sieving

Sieving is a mechanical process employed to separate particles based on their size. It involves passing a mixture of particles through a sieve, a mesh-like device with uniform openings, where smaller particles pass through while larger particles are retained. In chemical and physical analytical methods, sieving is utilized to achieve particle size fractionation, enabling the isolation of specific size ranges for analysis. This technique is crucial for characterizing particle size distribution, assessing sample purity, and ensuring uniformity in materials, facilitating accurate analysis of properties such as particle size distribution, surface area, and porosity, which are vital for optimizing processes and product performance in various industries.

Stirring

Stirring is a mechanical process used to mix substances uniformly by agitating them with a stirring device. Typically achieved using magnetic stirrers, overhead stirrers, or manual stirring rods, stirring ensures thorough blending of components in liquids or powders. In chemical analysis, stirring is crucial for homogenizing samples, facilitating even distribution of solutes, catalysts, or reagents, thereby promoting consistent reactions and enabling accurate analysis of properties such as concentration, viscosity, and reaction kinetics.

Drying

Drying is the process of removing moisture or other volatile substances from a material to achieve a specified level of dryness. It is commonly accomplished through methods such as air drying, oven drying, or freeze drying, depending on the nature of the material and desired results. Drying is an important step in the sample preparation – by eliminating moisture, solvents, or other interfering substances, it ensures the accuracy and reliability of subsequent analyses. Drying is utilized to determine the moisture content, assess the stability of materials, and facilitate precise measurements of mass and composition, thereby facilitating accurate characterization and analysis of different materials.

Our laboratories are equipped with drying cabinets covering the temperature range from ambient to 300°C.

Centrifugation

Centrifugation is a technique used to separate components of a mixture based on their density differences by subjecting the mixture to centrifugal force. It involves spinning a mixture at high speeds in a centrifuge, causing heavier particles to settle at the bottom of the centrifuge tube while lighter particles remain suspended or rise to the top. Centrifugation is employed for various purposes such as separating solids from liquids, isolating specific components of a sample, and purifying substances from impurities.

Our laboratories are equipped with centrifuge ROTINA 420 R (Hettich)

Thermal treatment

Thermal treatment involves subjecting materials to controlled heating or cooling processes to induce desired physical or chemical changes. This can include annealing, calcination, sintering, or quenching, depending on the intended outcome. In chemical and physical analytical methods, thermal treatment is utilized to modify material properties, such as crystallinity, phase composition, microstructure, and mechanical properties, for enhanced characterization and optimization. It enables the investigation of thermal stability, reaction kinetics, and phase transitions, providing valuable insights into the behaviour and performance of materials across a wide range of applications in research, development, and manufacturing processes.

To create optimal process conditions in the range 100 – 1150 °C we use different size and types of muffle and tube furnaces.

Fuel Analysis

Ash analysis

A method used to determine the inorganic residue left behind after combustion of organic materials. This process is typically conducted by heating a sample to complete combustion, followed by quantifying the remaining ash content through gravimetric method. Ash analysis is used to assess the mineral composition, purity, and quality of materials. It provides valuable information about the mineral content, presence of impurities, and overall stability of substances for quality control, product certification, and regulatory compliance, aiding in quality control, regulatory compliance, and product optimization processes.

Calorific value measurement

A method used to quantify the amount of energy released during the combustion of a substance. This is typically achieved by burning a known quantity of the material in a controlled environment and measuring the heat produced. It is widely utilized in industries such as energy production, fuel testing, and material analysis to assess the efficiency and suitability of fuels, determine their heating capabilities, and optimize processes for maximum energy output.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with:

  • Combustion calorimeter (C200, IKA)

Chemical Treatment and Analysis

Digestion

Digestion in analytical chemistry refers to the process through which a sample is converted from a solid to a liquid. This is done by applying reagents, which may include strong acids and bases. Heat is often used to speed up the digestion process, where both the sample and the agent are heated.

Spectrophotometry

Measures the amount of light, primarily focusing on visible light, absorbed by a substance at specific wavelengths. This information is then used to quantify the concentration of the analyte in a solution or liquid – the colour intensity is proportional to the concentration of the compound of interest.

Proper colorimetric/photometric analysis involves three elements: sample preparation and delivery; colorimetry (combining the sample and reagent to produce colour); and photometry (measurement of the resulting colour intensity).

For the photometric analysis, our laboratory is equipped with a spectrophotometer “Nanocolor 500D”(Macherey-Nagel).

Molecular spectroscopy

Molecular characterisation of solids, liquids and powders by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy provides information on the structure and composition of the material. Both methods provide a spectrum that characterises the specific vibration of a molecule – a „molecular fingerprint“.

  • FTIR-spectroscopy using attenuated total reflection technique (ATR-IR):

By measuring the attenuation of infrared light that penetrates into the sample through the internal reflection element, ATR-IR spectroscopy provides valuable information about the molecular structure and composition of thin films, liquids, and solids. It is a rapid, non-destructive technique. This makes it a powerful analytical tool in various scientific and industrial applications.
Our laboratory is equipped with an ATR- FTIR spectrometer “HazMatID Chemical identifier”.

  • Raman spectroscopy:

The inelastic scattering of monochromatic light by interaction with a sample is the basis of Raman spectroscopy. The scattered light undergoes energy shifts corresponding to vibrational modes, which provide detailed information about molecular structure and composition in the form of a Raman spectrum. The method is used to identify inorganic and organic substances, contaminants, and impurities, and to analyse liquids, fibres and very small particles.

 Bruker SENTERRA Raman spectrometer with integrated optical (confocal) microscope is used for Raman spectroscopy analysis in our laboratory.

 

Potentiometry

A technique to measures the voltage of a solution to determine its concentration or activity. It typically involves the use of a potentiometric sensor, such as a pH electrode or ion-selective electrode.

Our chemical laboratory is equipped with:

  • pH Meter (Five Easy FE20 (Mettler Toledo) and IS 2100 L (VWR))
  • Titrator DL77 (Mettler Toledo)

 

Our laboratories are equipped with drying cabinets covering the temperature range from ambient to 300°C.